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Rich nations are dependent on migrants post Covid

By keeping so many people in place, the pandemic has made demographic imbalances more obvious — rapidly aging rich nations produce too few new workers, while countries with a surplus of young people often lack work for all. As the pandemic heads into a third year, a global battle for young immigrant workers is underway. Covid kept many people in place.

Covid’s disruptions have pushed many people to retire, resign or just not return to work. But its effects run deeper. By keeping so many people in place, the pandemic has made humanity’s demographic imbalance more obvious — rapidly aging rich nations produce too few new workers, while countries with a surplus of young people often lack work for all. Covid is an accelerator of change and Countries have had to realize the importance of migration and immigrants. The pandemic has led to several major changes in global mobility. It slowed down labor migration. It created more competition for “digital nomads”.

As the global economy heats up and tries to put the pandemic aside, a battle for the young and able has begun. With fast-track visas and promises of permanent residency, many of the wealthy nations driving the recovery are sending a message to skilled immigrants all over the world. The push is especially focused on immigrants with skills that fall somewhere between physical labor and specialized higher education like Ph.D.

Canada, Germany, Israel, Australia and many more wealthy nations are encouraging skilled migrants. In the United States, immigration policy remains mostly stuck in place, with a focus on the Mexican border, where migrant detentions have reached a record high. In the United States, where baby boomers left the job market at a record rate last year, calls for reorienting immigration policy toward the economy are getting louder. One of the sharpest shifts may be in Japan, where a demographic time bomb has left diapers for adults outselling diapers for babies. After offering pathways to residency for aged-care, agriculture and construction workers two years ago, the government was also looking to let other workers on 5 year visas stay indefinitely and bring their families. In advanced economies, the immigration measures being deployed include lowering barriers to entry for qualified immigrants, digitizing visas to reduce By keeping so many people in place, the pandemic has made demographic imbalances more obvious — rapidly aging rich nations produce too few new workers, while countries with a surplus of young people often lack work for all. As the pandemic heads into a third year, a global battle for young immigrant workers is underway. Covid kept many people in place.

Covid’s disruptions have pushed many people to retire, resign or just not return to work. But its effects run deeper. By keeping so many people in place, the pandemic has made humanity’s demographic imbalance more obvious — rapidly aging rich nations produce too few new workers, while countries with a surplus of young people often lack work for all. Covid is an accelerator of change and Countries have had to realize the importance of migration and immigrants. The pandemic has led to several major changes in global mobility. It slowed down labor migration. It created more competition for “digital nomads”.

As the global economy heats up and tries to put the pandemic aside, a battle for the young and able has begun. With fast-track visas and promises of permanent residency, many of the wealthy nations driving the recovery are sending a message to skilled immigrants all over the world. The push is especially focused on immigrants with skills that fall somewhere between physical labor and specialized higher education like Ph.D.

Canada, Germany, Israel, Australia and many more wealthy nations are encouraging skilled migrants. In the United States, immigration policy remains mostly stuck in place, with a focus on the Mexican border, where migrant detentions have reached a record high. In the United States, where baby boomers left the job market at a record rate last year, calls for reorienting immigration policy toward the economy are getting louder. One of the sharpest shifts may be in Japan, where a demographic time bomb has left diapers for adults outselling diapers for babies. After offering pathways to residency for aged-care, agriculture and construction workers two years ago, the government was also looking to let other workers on 5 year visas stay indefinitely and bring their families. In advanced economies, the immigration measures being deployed include lowering barriers to entry for qualified immigrants, digitizing visas to reduce paperwork, increasing salary requirements to reduce exploitation and wage suppression, and promising a route to permanent status for workers most in demand.

Now several developed countries, facing aging labor forces and worker shortages, are racing to recruit, train and integrate foreigners. It’s a war for young talent as countries get serious about the need to have balanced demographics and meet labor shortages. As their birth rates plummet and citizens live longer, the wealthiest countries are desperately trying to bring in migrants to keep their economies afloat. Migration might be the most relevant force to have an impact on the age distribution in Europe to 2050.

But despite the gains for some workers and some locations, economists and demographers argue that labor market gaps will linger and widen, as the pandemic reveals how much more needs to be done to manage a global imbalance not just in population but also in development.

The world's 169 million international migrant workers comprise almost 5% of the global workforce, and they're integral to wealthy countries' economies.

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/23/world/asia/immigration-pandemic-labor-shortages.html?campaign_id=7&emc=edit_mbae_20211124&instance_id=46122&nl=morning-briefing%3A-asia-pacific-edition&regi_id=110409195&segment_id=75169&te=1&user_id=32df564c664da4cc3bee3448e44fc31a

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23030681-100-the-truth-about-migration-rich-countries-need-immigrants/paperwork, increasing salary requirements to reduce exploitation and wage suppression, and promising a route to permanent status for workers most in demand.

Now several developed countries, facing aging labor forces and worker shortages, are racing to recruit, train and integrate foreigners. It’s a war for young talent as countries get serious about the need to have balanced demographics and meet labor shortages. As their birth rates plummet and citizens live longer, the wealthiest countries are desperately trying to bring in migrants to keep their economies afloat. Migration might be the most relevant force to have an impact on the age distribution in Europe to 2050.

But despite the gains for some workers and some locations, economists and demographers argue that labor market gaps will linger and widen, as the pandemic reveals how much more needs to be done to manage a global imbalance not just in population but also in development.

The world's 169 million international migrant workers comprise almost 5% of the global workforce, and they're integral to wealthy countries' economies.

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/23/world/asia/immigration-pandemic-labor-shortages.html?campaign_id=7&emc=edit_mbae_20211124&instance_id=46122&nl=morning-briefing%3A-asia-pacific-edition&regi_id=110409195&segment_id=75169&te=1&user_id=32df564c664da4cc3bee3448e44fc31a

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23030681-100-the-truth-about-migration-rich-countries-need-immigrants/

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